All things Green Man & the traditional Jack-in-the-Green

Green Man of the Month

Yuletide Greetings

Salisbury Cathedral Copyright © The Company of the Green Man

Wishing all members of The Company of the Green Man a fantastic Yule. thanks to everyone for all the contributions and support during 2011. Here is a picture of one of the most seasonal Green Men I could think of from the roof of Salisbury Cathedral…He is wearing a Santa hat isn’t he?


Green Man of the Month (April 2010)

Green Man of the month for April is a  fabulous lichen covered Green Man on the exterior of St John the Baptist church in South Moreton, Oxfordshire. The church is mostly 13th and 14th Century although there are remains of a Saxon west door. The church also stands near to some ancient earthworks

This picture takes pride of place for March in The official Company of the Green Man calendar for 2010. All the photos have been taken by myself during 2009 and include some less well known green men that I’ve come across in my journeys. It’s available worldwide from our Cafepress shop at: http://www.cafepress.co.uk/cotgm

Please be aware that holidays marked in the calendar are US holidays, we will be producing a full UK version for 2011


Green Man of the Month (March 2010)

Green Man of the month for March is an extremely unusual blue green man roof boss from St Mary’s Church in Sileby Leicestershire. The earliest part of this church dates back to the 12th Century, although the roof dates back to the 15th Century.

This picture takes pride of place for March  in The official Company of the Green Man calendar for 2010. All the photos have been taken by myself during 2009 and include some less well known green men that I’ve come across in my journeys. It’s available worldwide from our Cafepress shop at:

http://www.cafepress.co.uk/cotgm

Please be aware that holidays marked in the calendar are US holidays, we will be producing a full UK version for 2011


Green Man of the Month (February 2010)

Green Man of the month for February is from The Church of St Mary the Virgin in Langley Marish, Berkshire.  The earlist part of the church dates from the twelfth Century, but it has been rebuilt restored and extended many times since then. The pictured Green Man is on the northern side of the chancel pillars. There are three faces on what are described as label stops, and include a green man, a green women and a green beast (possibly a lion) all three are beautifully detailed. They probably date to the 14th Century.  There are also another two smaller less detailed green men on window stops in the chancel.

This picture takes pride of place for February in The official Company of the Green Man calendar for 2010. All the photos have been taken by myself during 2009 and include some less well known green men that I’ve come across in my journeys. It’s available worldwide from our Cafepress shop at:

http://www.cafepress.co.uk/cotgm

 

Please be aware that holidays marked in the calendar are US holidays, we will be producing a full UK version for 2011


Green Man of the Month (January 2010)

 

Green Man of the month for January is from  The Church of St John the Evangelist in Northington, Berkshire.

 
This wonderful church was built through the generosity of the 4th Lord Ashburton and his wife Leonora. It replaced a church built in 1832 by Edward Hunt which in turn stood on the site of a Mediaeval church,. Unusually the modern day church does not stand on the site of these two churches, they stood in what is now the car park and material from both the buildings was used as aggregate for the concrete during the construction of the modern building. The architect was Sir Thomas Graham Jackson a pupil of Sir Gilbert Scott.

The church boasts seven Green Men and one Green Women all of exceptional quality. The Green Man pictured takes pride of place for January in The official Company of the Green Man calendar for 2010. All the photos have been taken by me over the last year and include some less well known green men that I’ve come across in my journeys. It’s available worldwide from our Cafepress shop at : http://www.cafepress.co.uk/cotgm

Please be aware that holidays marked in the calendar are US holidays, we will be producing a full UK version for 2011


Green Man of the Month

Green Man of the month for August has long been one of my favourites and is also the one I adopted for the Company of the Green Man Website. I’m often asked where he comes from. He is one of an identical pair that reside on a wooden lych gate leading to Stanton St Quinton Parish Church (St Giles) in Wiltshire. The Church is on the main road through the village and also boasts a possible Sheela Na Gig hidden high on the church tower (For more info about these fascinating images look no further than John Harding’s Sheela Na Gig Project web site www.sheelanagig.org)

The Church dates back to the 12th C but the lych gate is possibly late 19th early 20th Century. The two carved wood green men are surprisingly small and are very easy to miss. They sit diagonally opposite each other at eye level on a carved border. The leaves sprouting from their mouths appear to be acanthus and the green men themselves are extremely unusual.


Green Man of the Month

St Peter's Church Charney Bassett Oxfordshire

St Peter's Church Charney Bassett Oxfordshire

These 12 Green Men (and beasts) adorn the 12th Century Tympanum of St Peter’s Church in Charney Bassett Oxfordshire. The church is extremely old and would have been originally built in what was a remote marshland settlement. It is probable that the existing Norman church was erected on the site of an earlier wooden Saxon church. Although early Saxon churches were commonly of wood they were not necessarily wholly of wood. It is possible that the Saxon church at Charney may have had some stonework in it, possibly evidenced by the enigmatic carved tympanum now over a side doorway in the chancel. A mysterious figure between two gryphons, possibly ascending to heaven has been identified as Alexander the Great in a Christian manifestation. Although probably Saxon it is also possible that it may be Norse, as this area came much under Norse Viking influence during the reign of  Cnut (Canute). There is also an ancient legend that Cnut had a palace at Cherbury.

Our twelve Green Men are part of another (I think equally fascinating)  archway over the south (Main) door to the church. and is also undoubtedly very old, and may indeed be twelfth century Norman work.

To see more pictures of this arch visit the COTGM flicr site at http://www.flickr.com/photos/thecompanyofthegreenman


Green Man Of The Month

 This fascinating and extremely enigmatic Green Man gazes across the graveyard out to sea from one side of an external arch of St Augustine’s Church in Ramsgate.

Approached via a small gate to the side of the church you need to make your way right along the back of the church until you reach an arched doorway on the other of the church. Although I had seen photos of this Green Man it was still a real surprise to see the quality and intricacy of the design up close.

The Church was designed by the architect Pugin (1812-1852) who is best remembered for his work on numerous churches as well as the Houses of Parliament.

Pugin’s own house “The Grange” is next door to the Church which Pugin actually built for himself. Work on the Church began in 1844 but was not finished at Pugin’s death (He is buried in a vault beneath the chapel.)  It was completed by his eldest son Edward. 

The inspiration for the Green Man probably came from Pugin’s father Auguste Charles, who wrote Gothic Ornaments, Selected from Various Buildings in England and France, published in 1831. The carver may have been either George Myers who built the church for Pugin or one of his more promising apprentices. 

I am indebted to Abbot Paulinus Greenwood OSB and Catriona Blaker of The Pugin Society for their assistance in finding information about this Green Man