All Things Green Man & The Traditional Jack-in-the-Green

Author Archive

Bradford on Avon Green Man Festival

The organisers have announced that sadly but understandably this years BOA Green Man festival and Jack in the Green has been cancelled.


Knutsford Royal May Day

Statement from the organisers

 

“It with enormous regret that the Knutsford Royal May Day Festival Committee has taken the very difficult decision to cancel the 2020 Festival, which was due to take place on Saturday 2 May.

“Having taken on board the advice given by the Government, Public Health England and the NHS, we are left with no other option than to cancel this year’s Festival,” says Steve Wilkinson, Chairman of the Committee.

“We realise that this decision will leave a lot of children disappointed in and around the town, but we feel that this is the correct decision given the current circumstances and for the health and welfare of all concerned, both children and volunteers.”


Hastings Traditional Jack in the Green

Statement from the organisers of the Hastings Traditional Jack in the Green:

 

“It is with great sadness that Hastings Traditional Jack in the Green has decided that in the current circumstances it would be both impossible and irresponsible to go ahead this year.

This is not a decision we have come to lightly and know that many people will, like us, be devastated. Not only is this for many of us a major high point of our year, it is also vital to kick-starting the local summer economy. We will be meeting regularly to discuss the situation as advice from the government evolves.

We would like to thank all of our supporters, volunteers and local businesses for their continued support. Please keep safe everyone, look after yourselves. 🌿”


Annual Events 2020

In light of the current situation it is highly likely that some of this years annual events involving the Traditional Jack in Green may be cancelled or changed. I will do my best to keep our annual events page as up to date as possible but would really appreciate a heads up if anyone hears of any changes before I do.


The Enchanted Valley

 

The appropriately named Foliate Head Press has just published a guide to the Llanthony Valley, which runs between Hay-on-Wye and Abergavenny, in the Black Mountains. The Enchanted Valley is a guide to the myths and legends of this beautiful area and notes all the ancient and mystical spots along the route. It also features four green men, in Abergavenny’s Priory Church.

‘Be prepared to lose an hour as you explore the Priory Church because it is home to many beautiful monuments and tombs, one of which boasts four green men. They are tricky to spot on this highly decorated 16th century monument, but once the first is identified, the others become obvious to the eye. The choir stalls date from the 14th century and host several charming carvings of dragons and other mythical creatures.’

There are a surprising number of fascinating places in this valley, which is only twenty miles long, and as the book description says: ‘Driving along the only road through the Llanthony Valley is a joy; the landscape never disappoints. But to experience the Valley properly, one must leave the car and explore, seek out those old places where a certain sense of timelessness tugs at the heart. Taking you on a journey from Hay on Wye to Abergavenny, this book will introduce you to all these places and also the folklore and myths associated with them. It should come as no surprise that this landscape is home to fairies, that the oldest buildings harbour ghosts, or that holy wells have stories of miracles attached to them. Many tales which are firmly rooted in history also sound like folklore — but who are we to deny that they happened the way the storytellers say?’

The author Melanie Warren, has collected British folk tales and ghost stories for almost four decades. She lives in Lancashire but visits the Llanthony Valley each summer, along with family and assorted friends. In a decade of such visits, she has collected a wealth of fascinating information about the area and delights in introducing first-time visitors to the places in this book.

The Enchanted Valley, by M. E. Warren, is available now from Foliate Head Press,

https://bit.ly/33iXAme

for £9.99 plus postage.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Rochester (Blue Bell Hill) 1st May

Rochester (Blue Bell Hill) Jack-in-the-Green (Revived 1981)

The Rochester Jack was revived in 1981 by Gordon Newton and based on accounts written by Charles Dickens in his ‘Sketches by Boz.’ The Rochester Jack-in-the-Green is brought to life during a fantastic ceremony that takes place at Dawn on May 1st at the top of Bluebell Hill each year.

Originally revived by Boughton Monchelsea Morris, custodianship of Jack was passed to Motley Morris in 1984 who now Wake Jack with various other Morris sides at dawn on May Morning (approximately 5:32am) at the Bluebell Hill picnic area surrounded by twelve bonfires. Jack is also paraded through the streets of Rochester by Motley Morris usually on the bank holiday Monday as part of the very popular three day Sweeps Festival. An article in the Chatham and Rochester Observer in 1932 states that ” Sixty years ago (the 1870’s) it was not considered May Day if we had not seen at least three Jacks-in-the-Green and their attendants from Rochester and Chatham.”

Jack in the Green by Martin Graebe

Now winter is over I’m happy to say
And we’re all met again in our ribbons so gay
And we’re all met again on the first day of spring
To go about dancing with Jack in the green
Jack in the green, Jack in the green
To go about dancing with Jack in the green

Now Jack in the green is a very strange man
Though he dies every autumn, he’s born every spring
And every year on his birthday, we will dance through the streets
And in return Jack, he will ripen our wheat (as above)

With his mantle he’ll cover the trees that are bare
And our gardens he’ll trim with his jacket so fair
And our fields he will sow with the hairs on his head
And our grain it will ripen till old Jack is dead

Now the sun is half up and betokens the hour
That the children arrive with their garlands of flowers
So now let the music and dancing begin
And touch the young heart of young Jack in the Green

In 1981, several members of local Cotswold Morris teams decided to perform dances from the Welsh Borders on an occasional basis. They called themselves “Dartford Motley” after the town where practices were held.  The name soon changed to “Motley Morris”.

Motley Morris

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Guildford Bush – TBC

 

Guildford Bush (Revived 1976)

Known as The Guildford Bush, this Jack is accompanied by the Pilgrim Morris Men of Guildford during the annual Summerpole all day event in Guildford. They meet at the bottom of the High street and process to Holy Trinity Church with the Maypole. The Maypole is erected on Castle Green and the dancing involving guest Morris sides begins. This Jack was revived in 1976 by Pilgrim Morris. For many years the Jack was carried by folklorist  George Frampton.

Pilgrim Morris were founded in 1972, during the summer months they dance around Surrey and north-east Hampshire, and occasionally further afield. The Guildford Jack is built from Laurel and usually stands just ten inches higher than the occupant who is “usually somebody of less than average height.” “The activity of the bush depends on the inclination of the carrier. Sometimes it gets in the way of the dancers and entertains the public and at other times it just stands around.

Pilgrim Morrismen

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Knutsford – 2nd May

Knutsford Jack-in-the-Green (Since 1890)

The Knutsford Jack in the Green is probably the oldest continual annual Jack in the Green. Apart from the war years and one recent year it has paraded every year since 1889. May Day in Knutsford (Cheshire) is celebrated over the May Bank holiday weekend. The main focus is the May Queen.

The person who plays Jack is chosen each year and is now played by a  youngster rather than an adult as it used to be. The Knutsford Jack was not one of the early Jacks but like many others in the late 19th Century was a much tamed Victorian revival having first appeared in May 1864 “based on earlier traditions and festivities” by the Rev. Robert Clowes the Vicar of Knutsford.

Knutsford Royal Mayday

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Oxford – May 1st

Oxford Jack-in-the-Green (Revived 1951)


The Oxford Jack-in-the-Green appears every year in Oxford on May Morning. Oxford University Morris Men introduced Jack-in-the-Green to their May Morning festivities in 1951. At that time they were unaware that a Jack-in-the-Green was a common sight in and around Oxford in the 19th century. Oxford City Morris Men along with Oxford University Morris Men (Town and Gown) now share responsibility organising the Morris dancing in Oxford on May Morning led by Jack in the Green.

The Oxford Jack is usually first seen with the crowds near Magdalen Tower just before 6am and leads an informal procession up ‘The High’ to Radcliffe Square, where the first dance of the day: “Bonny Green” from Bucknell, starts at about 6.25am. Jack then moves  through New College Lane and Broad Street, concluding with a massed ‘Bonny Green Garters’ outside St. John’s College in St. Giles around 8.30am. After breakfast the Oxford University Morris Men and Oxford City Morris Men usually take Jack to a display for the children of St. Ebbe’s school when May Morning falls on a weekday.

Oxford University Morris Men

Oxford City Morris Men

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


The Company of the Green Man e-newsletter 18

 

The Company of the Green Man’s eighteenth e-newsletter has just been published and is available for members to download completely free via the members area tab at the top of this page. If you are a member you should receive an e-mail via MailChimp with details of how to access the  e-newsletter. If not please don’t hesitate to contact me using the “contact us” tab above.

If you would like to join The Company of the Green Man (it’s free) just use the “join us” tab at the top of this page or click HERE


RITUALS & DECLARATIONS ISSUE 1

Rituals and Declarations Zine issue 1 Winter 2019/2020

Limited-run (4 issues only) small-press magazine about the Weird. First issue Jan 2020, remaining 3 issues publishing quarterly after that

 

Contents

* Navigating the Hill of Dreams: the Significance of Folk Horror in an Age of Ecological Breakdown – by L B Limbrey

* Bodies of Water – Fiction by Sylvia Warren

* Acid Renaissance: Albion’s True Standard Advanced – Art by Paul Watson

* Cunning County by Emily Banting – Fiction by David Southwell, with art by Maria Strutz

* Bienvenue à Villefranche: Black Spot Season One – Review by David Southwell

* Cathexis – by Tim Dedopulos

* Cthulhu Madness – by Phil Hine, with art by Maria Strutz

* The Demon’s Mistress or the Demon’s Self: The Snake and the Monstrous Feminine – by Maria J Pérez Cuervo

* O Sunny Hour! Towards the Centenary of the Vine Press – by Justin Hopper

 

https://ritualsdeclarations.bigcartel.com/


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Deptford (Fowler’s Troop) – May 1st

Fowlers Troop 2019 Jack in the Green

Deptford (Fowlers Troop) Jack-in-the-Green (Revived 1984)


In 1984 Mo Johnson and Andy Lamb built a Jack-in-the-Green in the back garden of the ‘Dog and Bell’ pub in Deptford. Mo was inspired by a photograph taken by contemporary historian Thankful Sturdee of the original Fowlers troop with their Jack in the Green c.1900. The revived Jack was paraded with Blackheath Morris (a side morphed from the Blackheath Foot’n’Death Men who used to dance at events featuring bands like Hawkwind and the Pink Fairies).

The current Fowlers Troop Jack goes out on the streets of South East London or the City of London each May Day accompanied by the current Fowler’s Troop a wonderful collection of costumed figures. The Deptford Jack often used to meet up with the now rarely sighted City of London Jack in the Green on May Day. When May Day fell on the Bank Holiday Monday both the Deptford and City of London Jacks often went to Hastings to join with the Hastings Jack in the Green in the celebrations. This last occurred in 2012. The Jack stands at around 11 feet tall when lifted. Graham Newson who took on the mantle as keeper and main carrier of the Jack in the early 90’s customised the interior of the Jack to include storage space for essentials including cigarettes, beer tankard a repair kit, a change of clothes and on occasions a set of morris sticks. After 30 years the original frame for the Deptford Jack in the Green (which was funded by Kevin Coyle the late landlord of The Dog and Bell pub) was past its best and so, in 2015, a new metal frame was created specially and paid for from a fund left by the late Doug Adams who was the lead musician of Fowler’s Troop. The Jack was christened at the start of the 2015 May Day procession. The Jack is usually dressed on April 30th at the Dog & Bell pub.

Fowler’s Troop and the Deptford Jack in the Green

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Hammersmith – 1st May

Hammersmith Jack-in-the-Green (Started 2009)

In 2009 Members of Hammersmith Morris created the Hammersmith Jack. This Jack is unique amongst the modern revivals in that it is largely covered with artificial foliage and is therefore relatively lightweight and portable. Each leaf is made from a variety of materials, all of it re-used and recycled. The leaves were created by many different people including local schools and community organisations that Jack has visited as part of its May Day perambulations over the years. As well as leaves made of paper, fabric and plastic, the Jack has other items attached that have some significance to either Hammersmith, the team, or the person who attached it. These can be almost anything, as long as they are small and easily attached to the bamboo and net frame and include jig competition medals, badges, train tickets, melodeon bellows and an iPod! A crown of fresh flowers and foliage is used to top the Jack each year on May 1st.

The Jack is paraded through Hammersmith on May 1st, regardless of which day of the week this falls, and wherever else the Jack visits on this day. This included 2016 when The Hammersmith Jack travelled west by train to appear at dawn in Sherborne, Dorset on May 1st. Jack was back home parading through Hammersmith by lunchtime. When May 1st is a normal weekday then Jack and the team will visit schools and care homes in the local area, as well as local pubs. The Hammersmith Jack in the Green is very much a free spirited urban Jack, having no attendants other than the Morris Dancers and musicians and mostly being left to his own devices. As such the Jack can at times be spotted parading the streets of Hammersmith completely on its own, creating a special kind of gentle mayhem unique to The Hammersmith Jack.

People have reported an earlier incarnations but this is uncorroborated by current team members. On May Day in 1984 the Earls of Essex Morris, with Mick Skrzypiec in their Jack, met at dawn on Wanstead Flats to see the sun rise.  After breakfast they travelled by commuter train into Liverpool Street and started the first City of London Jack-in-the-Green procession. They were joined at the Magog’s pub in Milk Street by the Deptford (Fowler’s Troop) Jack and one other Jack which a member of Fowler’s Troop recalls as being carried by Mike Mullen. Mike danced with Hammersmith Morris but this Jack appears to have been an individual effort by him rather than the work of the team.

The World Famous Hammersmith Morris Men or Smiffs were formed in 1959. Kitted out in blue and gold they continue to entertain audiences around the country with their lively and engaging style.

Hammersmith Morris

 

 

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Garland – Islington Milk Maid’s Garland – May 1st

Islington Milk Maid’s Garland (Revived 1981)
New Esperance Morris have paraded the Islington Milkmaid’s Garland through Islington every May Day since 1981 when it was first revived with the help of Dave Lobb’s research and inspiration. The Milkmaids Garlands date back to the 17th Century and were the precursor to The Traditional Jack in the Green.

The Islington Milk Maid’s Garland is about five feet tall, and needs two people to carry it. New Esperance also take the Islington Milk Maid’s Garland to Hastings for the Traditional Jack in the Green Bank Holiday each year.

New Esperance Morris (known as Esps to their friends) have been continuing the tradition of women’s Morris dancing in London since the 1970s. They draw on a rich heritage, specifically that of Mary Neal, who set up the first women’s Morris, Esperance Club in 1896 and later became involved with the suffrage movement. New Esperance dance Cotswold Dances in the traditions of Bledington, Fieldtown, Ilmington, and their own Esperance tradition.

New Esperance Morris

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Dead Horse Morris – Friday 1st May

Whitstable (Dead Horse Morris) Jack-in-the-Green


Dead Horse Morris have a Jack-in-the-Green clad entirely in Ivy who takes part in the Dawn Rising celebrations on Whitstable Beach on May 1st each year. He then takes part in the Whitstable May celebrations. The Jack is built of ivy leaves tied together in bunches and then fixed to a light-weight frame. In it’s final form it also boasts a crown.

Dead Horse Morris are a Morris side from Whitstable in Kent made up of the Dead Horse Morris Men and the Broomdashers ladies team. They dance a regional style of the traditional English Morris Dance, although they lean more towards the “Border” style and “Molly Dancing” than the better known bells-and-hankies Cotswold dances.

Dead Horse Morris was formed in 1986 they dance in heavy hob-nailed boots, use short blackthorn sticks and their kit is based on the ordinary working clothes of a local fisherman or dredger of the late 19th Century.

Dead Horse Morris

 

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Brentham – Saturday 9th May

Brentham Jack-in-the-Green (Since 1919)
Brentham has a big celebration every May which includes a Jack in the Green described as a walking talking bush who sometimes parades barefoot and is often formed of exotic foliage. Brentham’s May Day tradition became established in 1919 after the end of the First World War and expanded considerably for 1921 when the first Jack-in-the-Green appeared.  May Day wasn’t celebrated in Brentham between 1927 and 1930 but from 1931 except for the war years, Brentham May Day has had an uninterrupted run.

In 1981 the procession very nearly did not take place. “With just one day to go to the celebrations, the organisers received a letter from Scotland Yard instructing them to observe a 28-day ban on marches in London. Ironically, it seems that “May Day procession” had suggested extreme leftwing intentions to Scotland Yard. With extraordinary speed the May Day organisers arranged a High Court hearing, where the judge was shown photographs of past May Day processions. He concluded that the children “did not look like a very subversive lot”, and he gave permission for the procession to go ahead. In the meantime the police had exempted the procession from the ban, though, curiously, on “religious” grounds. May Day that year will be remembered as the first and only time in the history of the Brentham tradition that prayers were said at the beginning and the end of the proceedings.

Brentham May Day

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Bovey Tracey – 1st May

Bovey Tracey/Grimspound Morris Jack-in-the-Green

The Bovey Tracey Jack-in-the-Green goes out with Grimspound Morris. He can be seen greeting the Mayday dawn up on Haytor and then afterwards puts in an appearance in Bovey Tracey.

Grimspound Morris was formed in 1994 from a group of ex-Cotswold style dancers and a few friends, some of whom were also Rapper Sword dancers. They dance with vigour and in an uncompromising “border” style. Many of their dances are now their own, using figures and movements from that style to create something that is unique to them.

Grimspound Morris

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Boss Morris – 1st May

Boss Morris Jack-in-the-Green (started 2017)

Boss Morris Jack in the Green is actually a Jacky in the Green. She was created in April 2017 and first appeared on Painswick Beacon at dawn on May Dawn 2017 at an annual hop hosted by Gloucestershire Morris Men with Boss Morris, Stroud Ladies Morris & Miserden Morris attending. She is entirely formed from recycled materials. The Boss Morris Jacky is not slain at the end of the day but instead the Spirit of Summer in the form of petals can be seen emanating from her. Jacky lives at an eco-housing community while she is sleeping throughout the rest of the year.

Boss Morris is an all female Morris Dancing side that sprang up out of the five valleys of Stroud, Gloucestershire in 2015. The twelve-strong group of dancers now regularly hops and performs across the UK with their unique take on the traditional English Folk dance. Boss Morris is an eclectic group of professional performers, dancers, musicians, artists and a horde of magical beasts who create tailored performances for vibrant and exciting events. Boss is well known by folk and artistic communities alike, with audiences and fans from far and wide. Cotswold Morris is the side’s main dance form but they take inspiration from many types of dance, old and new.  Boss’s style pulls on ancient customs and traditional dances but gives them a modern twist with their striking attire, dazzling the crowds.

Alongside building strong roots in their local community and the wider folk scene, Boss also work extensively with prominent artists and musicians; touring and performing with bands, featuring in music videos and performing at music festivals.

Boss Morris

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Events 2020 – Jack in the Green – Winchcombe – 1st May

Winchcombe Jack-in-the-Green (Revived 2009)
The Winchcombe (Gloucestershire) Jack was revived on August 31st 2009 as part of “Marking the Year.” A Jack was recorded as visiting a local school by Emma Dent of Sudeley Castle in the 1890’s. The Jack was then resurrected for May Day 2010 and a local May bank holiday village fete and is now awoken  every year at dawn on May Day by Happenstance Border Morris and appears at various events in the following  days. The Winchombe Jack sometimes met up with the Cheltenham Jack-in-the-Green during the years it was active.

Happenstance is a mixed Border Morris side dancing to live music. They are based in Winchcombe, Gloucestershire nestling in the shadow of Cleeve Hill

Happenstance Morris

 

Over the coming months I will be featuring details of each of the current revived Jacks in the Green that currently parade each year. 

If anyone has any corrections or further information about any of the Jacks that I feature I would love to hear from you. I would also really appreciate any photographs of any of the Jacks from any of the years they have paraded to add to our Image Archive.


Annual Events 2020

 

Listed HERE are all known annual events for 2020 that feature The traditional Jack-in-the-Green or The Green Man throughout the UK. This list will be regularly updated.

I would be extremely grateful if anyone who attends any of these events would send us pictures, videos or written accounts for the archive. If anyone knows of any events that are not listed here or if there are any corrections/amendments required please don’t hesitate to contact me.

If you are new to these pages and are wondering just what on earth a Jack in the Green is then your whistle stop tour of the history of the Traditional Jack in the Green can be found right HERE.


Whittlesea Straw Bear Festival 2020

If any of our members or blog follows are heading off to Whittlesea next weekend to see the wonderful Straw Bear Festival please do send us some photos of the event for the blog and archives. More information about the event and timings can be found at www.strawbear.org.uk

The festival of the Straw Bear or “Strawbower” is an old custom known only to a small area of Fenland on the borders of Huntingdonshire and Cambridgeshire. On Plough Tuesday, the day after the first Monday after Twelfth Night, a man or a boy would be covered from head to foot in straw and led from house to house where he would dance in exchange for gifts of money, food or beer. The festival was of a stature that farmers would often reserve their best straw making the bear.

The custom died out in about 1909, probably because the local police regarded it as begging, but it was resurrected by the Whittlesea Society in 1980.

The festival has now expanded to cover the whole weekend when the Bear appears not on Plough Tuesday but the second weekend in January. On the Saturday of the festival, the Bear progresses around the streets with its attendant “keeper” and musicians, followed by traditional dance sides (mostly visitors), including morris men and women, molly dancers, rappers and longsword dancers, clog dancers, who perform at points along the route


Wassail & Grimspound Morris 4th January


Twelfth Night Celebrations Sunday 5th January 2020

Twelth Night

Happy New Year to all of our members and blog followers.

If you need to escape the post Christmas and New Year blues I would highly recommend the Twelfth Night celebrations on Bankside outside Shakespeare’s Globe starting at 2pm on Sunday 5th January 2020.

Twelfth Night is an annual seasonal celebration held in the Bankside area of London. It is a celebration of the New Year, mixing ancient seasonal customs with contemporary festivity. It is free, accessible to all and happens whatever the weather.

To herald the celebration, the extraordinary Holly Man the Winter guise of the Green Man (and an honorary member of The Company of the Green Man) decked in fantastic green garb and evergreen foliage is piped over the River Thames, with the devil Beelzebub.

With the crowd by Shakespeare’s Globe, led by the Bankside Mummers and the London Beadle, the Holly Man will ‘bring in the green’ and toast or ‘wassail’ the people, the River Thames and the Globe (an old tradition encouraging good growth).

Mummers will then process to the Bankside Jetty, and perform the traditional ‘freestyle’ St. George Folk Combat Play, featuring the Turkey Sniper, Clever Legs, the Old ‘Oss and many others, dressed in spectacular costumes. The play is full of wild verse and boisterous action, a time-honoured part of the season recorded since the Crusades.

Cakes distributed at the end of the play have a bean and a pea hidden in two of them. Those from the crowd who find them are hailed King and Queen for the day and crowned with ceremony.

They then lead the people through the streets to the historic George Inn Southwark, for a fine warming-up with the Fowlers Troop, Storytelling, the Kissing Wishing Tree, Dancing and Mulled Wine.

If you go please do take some pictures and send them to me for the blog and if possible perhaps send me a short piece on your experience for the next e-newsletter

You can find more details via the Lions Part website below:

Twelfth Night Celebrations


Yuletide Greetings

Salisbury Cathedral Copyright © The Company of the Green Man

It’s that time of the year when the Santa hatted green man from Salisbury Cathedral puts in his annual appearance on our blog!

Wishing all members and followers of The Company of the Green Man a Very Merry Yule. My thanks to everyone for all the contributions and support during 2019.

The next newsletter is being lovingly crafted and will hopefully be with you some time over the festive period.